JOHN CHUCKMAN’S PLACES – SOUTH SHORE CHICAGO – PHOTO – CHICAGO – CART – SIMILAR TO WHAT WE USED TO DELIVER NEWSPAPERS IN THE 1950s – ONLY THEY WERE OFTEN BIGGER AND HAD A HANDLE ACROSS THE BACK – WINDSOR PARK (EXCHANGE AVE) AND SOUTH SHORE (75TH STREET) NEWS AGENCIES   5 comments

SEE:

THE COLD CHILL OF DARKNESS: A SHORT STORY BY JOHN CHUCKMAN – SET IN SOUTH SHORE NEIGHBORHOOD

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Posted February 3, 2010 by JOHN CHUCKMAN in Uncategorized

5 responses to “JOHN CHUCKMAN’S PLACES – SOUTH SHORE CHICAGO – PHOTO – CHICAGO – CART – SIMILAR TO WHAT WE USED TO DELIVER NEWSPAPERS IN THE 1950s – ONLY THEY WERE OFTEN BIGGER AND HAD A HANDLE ACROSS THE BACK – WINDSOR PARK (EXCHANGE AVE) AND SOUTH SHORE (75TH STREET) NEWS AGENCIES

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  1. I pushed several of these carts for both news agencys. At times we woould set in the trunk of a car, hang on to the handle of the cart, and the driver would pull us to our route. I also remember putting more than one rolled up paper throough someones third floor window. Except for Thursday or Sunday, it was a lot easier to roll and throw the paper up 2 or 3 stories (back entrances), than walk up the stairs.

    • Thanks, Bill,

      I searched for a picture of one of these for a long time, and finally found it under garden stuff. It’s close to identical to what we used to use.

      I remember sitting in the back of Larry’s station wagon (South Shore Agency, 75th Street) holding the cart behind in the still-dark mornings to go to my Tribune route near South Shore High School.

      I never broke a window but did create some awful clatters with garbage cans or bottles sitting on porches.

      My other routes were for the Daily News on afternoons, smaller routes for which I used a grocery cart.

      You might enjoy my short story, “The Cold Chill of Darkness” on this site. It pretty vividly describes doing the Tribune route on a very cold winter morning.

      Thanks again,
      John Chuckman

  2. A friend of mine, Bruce McBain, and I were reminiscing about our paper route days. I also remember a girl that lived in the apartment building at 79th and Essex, Rochelle Kolchawick (S?). You might have know her. She dated an old friend of mine.

    I did enjoy your short story. Thanks. Have a good day John.

  3. John- I worked for the Chicago Daily News 1966-67. We worked out of the corner of 74th & Exchange. I had a route with about 65 papers. We used these carts. Monday-Friday after school I would leave from Bradwell. Delivered from 74th to 73rd, Exchange to Yates. I was only 10, I could barley see over the top of the cart!!! But I had a job- $15.00 a month!!! We delivered Saturday morning also… The Daily News had no Sunday Paper.

    • Hi Curt,

      I worked at the same agency a decade before. It was called Windsor Park News Agency, and the man who looked after things was named Chuck, so we typically called the place Chuck’s.

      I had a comparable route, from 73rd to 75th and Colfax, then along 75th to Coles Ave, turning left toward 73rd.

      Boy, did salaries go up by your time. I do remember when I started, I made $7 per month. Nevertheless, it felt good and my mom was proud of me.

      Later I worked for South Shore News Agency on 75th, where a man named Larry ran things. I started with the Daily News again, and then did a morning Tribune route with 200 papers each day, including Sundays and holidays, even Christmas.

      The Tribune route was when I really needed the wooden cart – there was no other way to handle that many papers. We used to go to the agency very early, 4:30 to 5 a.m., and start rolling papers to pack in your cart.

      Then Larry shuttled people to their routes in his station wagon. You’d sit on the open tailgate and hold your cart with two hands while he drove carefully to your delivery area. Mine was just west of South Shore High School.

      The money was much more serious, $35 per month plus the absolutely amazing tips at Christmas, generally in excess of a $100 if you put in the time later in the day to go around knocking on doors.

      Such, such were the joys,

      John Chuckman

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